Sutures, Staples, Glue, Zipper: Which Do Your Wounds Need?

  Health Beauty

If you or your child has a minor cut or abrasion at home, you should clean the wound and put a bandage on it. However, if you have a more serious cut, laceration or break in the skin, your doctor may use other methods to close your wound. These may include sutures, staples, glue, or zipper ties.
The type of material and technique your doctor uses depends on many factors, and LOOKMED has you covered.


 


Staples


Doctors may use skin staplers to quickly close long skin wounds or to cut in hard-to-reach areas. Staples may dissolve in the body - meaning they are absorbable - or they may be external and need to be removed by your doctor.
There are many benefits to using staples. They allow your doctor to close your wound quickly and with minimal damage. They are easier to remove than sutures, and you spend less time under anesthesia. You also have a lower risk of infection with absorbable staples.


 


Sutures, Staples, Glue, Zipper: Which Do Your Wounds Need?


 



Band-Aids


Doctors use adhesive tape to pull the edges of minor skin wounds together. Skin tapes cost less than other types of materials used to close wounds. However, over time, tape can lose its stickiness, especially if it gets wet. If it loosens, the wound may open.
Your doctor may use tape if you have minor cuts, lacerations or incisions (low-tension wounds). If you have buried or absorbable skin sutures (stitches), they may also use it during surgery.



Sutures


This is the most common technique used to close skin wounds. The surgeon uses a surgical thread called a suture to sew (or stitch) the two ends of the skin together. Surgeons once used animal tendons, horse hair, plant fragments or human hair to close them. Today, they are made of natural or man-made materials, such as plastic, nylon or silk.
The sutures may be permanent or absorbable (they dissolve in the body).



Zipper


This is an alternative to traditional sutures. It is usually used for wounds that require regular monitoring by a physician. It combines a zipper and two adhesives, which are placed on either side of the wound and trimmed to the right size after surgery. When the zipper is closed, it pulls the edges of the skin together. Studies have shown that removing it is painless, so it may be a good option for children. The zipper should not be used on bariatric patients and patients with wounds that are curved more than 20 degrees.


 


 


Sutures, Staples, Glue, Zipper: Which Do Your Wounds Need?


 



Glue


Doctors use surgical glue-also called "tissue adhesive" or "liquid sutures"-to close major and minor wounds, such as lacerations, incisions made during laparoscopic surgery, and wounds to the face or groin.
The benefits of surgical glue include lower infection rates, no stitches or sutures, faster return to work and no need for stitch removal.
The cost of surgical adhesive is higher than sutures. The application of glue requires precise technique. Ask your doctor about their experience with this wound closure material.


 Published date:

June 23, 2022

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